WHO WE ARE

Our group is self-funded, with the mandate to not only serve the paranormal community, but also the communities in which we live. Through our various endeavors, we not only raise money to support our own group, but we also help raise money to support private businesses, historical societies, and non-for-profit charities.

PHILOSOPHY

We are a small group of eclectic individuals who view the investigation of the paranormal not as a scientific endeavor, but one of personal exploration.

This philosophy allows us to present a truly unique experience, and one that you will never forget.   

DEMAND THE BEST

The St. Louis Paranormal Research Society provides the best haunted- history and ghost tours in the St. Louis area.  We even provide the latest in ghost hunting equipment on select tours, so you can conduct an actual paranormal investigation.  

If you're looking for a paranormal experience, it's only a few clicks away!

OVER 16 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN THE PARANORMAL

The St. Louis Paranormal Research Society has existed for over sixteen years.  For our investigators, the paranormal is not just a hobby, it's their passion!

OUR SPECIALTIES
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  • Haunted and Historical Research

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1820 Cherokee Street

St. Louis, Missouri 63118

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Lambert Airport's Haunted D-Concourse

    

 

     I worked at Lambert Airport for some years, and in my experience, the D Concourse at night was a very creepy place.  Built in the early 80’s by Ozark Airlines, most of the flights served Midwest destinations,  meaning that the D Concourse was always noisy and packed with thousands of passengers, but at night it sat empty and eerily quiet.  For years, janitors, airport personnel, and airline employees working the graveyard shift often reported seeing a shadowy figure wandering between Gate 70 and the old International Terminal.   

     I worked for TWA, and after the American Airlines buy out, found a position at Chautauqua Airlines.  I worked second shift and often was held over if one terminating flights came in late or broke.  At that time the D Concourse was abandoned.  Walking down the empty concourse, you could see the forgotten remnants of TWA, hear airport announcements meant for passengers long past, and flights listings on the FISDO monitors that no longer existed.  The newspapers, advertisements, flight brochures, were several years out of date.  Employees would often venture to the D Concourse to hide out, sleep, and to use the cleaner bathrooms.

     It was even creepier under the terminal.  There were old break rooms, empty baggage conveyor belts, bag cart tunnels, and supervisor’s offices.  The entire facility appeared frozen in time.  The clocks still ran, the old monochrome computer screens were left on for years, and the refrigerators still had lunch bags inside them.  When American bought TWA, most of Lambert was shut down and scaled back in less than six months, costing thousands of jobs.  The place that once serviced thousands of employees and passengers was just abandoned.  Abandoned so quickly, that no one took the time or even thought of turning off the lights.

   Several times walking through the D Concourse and the baggage area underneath, I witnessed seeing the dark figure lurking around just almost out of sight.  Since the D Concourse is a long corridor, there with no real places to hide. The figured stayed far enough away that you couldn’t make out who it was, but close enough to know for sure it was an outline person.

   Some who witnessed the shadowy figured claimed it was a former Ozark Airline employee, whose name was long forgotten.  Some thought it was a ghost of a passenger that died on one of the arriving flights and was now permanently lost inside the D Concourse.

     In 2009 the D Concourse was walled off at either end, thus preventing anyone access to the abandoned passenger terminal.  You could still hear the eerie echoes of the old passenger announcements through the barricade walls.  Working for the airlines, I can say with some authority, that there is no place lonelier than an empty passenger terminal.  I wonder if the unknown ghost still wonders the abandoned D Concourse, possibly looking to board a flight that will now never come.

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